Dab When You Win. Dab When You Lose.
Trill or Not Trill?

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The last 2-3 months everyone from Hilary Clinton to Cam Newton have dabbing(someone please tell Hillary to never do it again, sheesh). hilary dabEven though Cam’s team lost the Super Bowl the Dab can teach us all a lot, in victory or defeat. And hey, it’s Dab Day on Trill or Not Trill, so you know we’ll find some leadership tips for you.

The Dab originated in Atlanta, Georgia; the land of hard beats and trap lyrics. It was originated by artist Flippa Da Skipper, back in the summer of 2014. The dance is simple. Let the beat hit your bones while tilting your head and forearm for a meeting (typically the proper way to protect your sneeze. Try it now. You get it? Lol). Dabbing is also appropriate for songs with strong beats and drops, as typically heard in EVERY single Future or Migos song. As senseless as this dance may sound there are some tips you can take away in marketing and leadership. So listen up Cam, pick your head up cause the Dab isn’t quite dead yet.

Tribe (During Victory)Cam Dab
In marketing we would call a dance movement like this, brand tribe. Brand tribe is a group of people brought together by a shared belief or movement. A few weeks back I did a presentation in which I started dabbing to relate with all the kids in the classroom. Next thing you know, a couple hours later everyone was bowing their heads as if I passed a cold or virus. (Hint they were Dabbin)A brand tribe could turn into a collective effort that will help your campus organization, business or classroom GO. As mentioned Flippa da skipper did this dance a year before it blew but with the help of Cam Newton, Sportscenter and social media it took off. As a leader, create fun trends that everyone will enjoy. The Dab is a beautiful dance when people are happy and free spirited. The same goes for those of you who hold positions of leadership. Create moments of memorable fun. A new club greeting  or handshake could do the trick. The people you lead should always feel comfortable and happy during your interactions. They should share your beliefs which entail will always set the tone among arrival.

Tribe (During Defeat)
Cam created a national frenzy and tribe with his dancing. A problem he ran into was the negative backlash from fans who thought he was showing poor sportsmanship. A positive movement will bring along haters and critics. In defeat, do not walk away in shame or angrily as Cam seemingly did. Face your biggest losses head on, with your head up and never let your enemies see you sweat. That is what they want! Use every defeat as a lesson to grow stronger.

The origin of the dab

The FACE (During Victories)
IMG_7233Your club, classroom, or organization should have a popular face to represent the brand. In business we call this the Brand Ambassador. Many people even me, as a big trap music fan had no idea who Flippa da skipper was, but then came Cam Newton. Many people believe Cam Newton was the catalyst of the dance when in all honestly the dance is nothing new to Atlanta. Sometimes the leader is not the face. Your most liked or popular member could be the person to take it into the next level. For example look at brands like Vitamin Water, Ciroc and Nike. They all have brand ambassadors who are perceived as the faces, owners or CEOs. Put your ego to the side and go with the person or thing that helps make this movement Pop. Don’t be afraid as a president of a club to name that vibrant, responsible and popular student, as your VP. I guarantee it will work out.

The FACE (In Defeat)
IMG_7232The meme, videos and quotes are flying about Cam Newton. Honestly, Cam is my favorite player, but his on field expressions and post game actions could have been better. As the face you are often forced to be politically correct and follow the culture. As the face of the NFL, you must take losses in stride and be an example to the youth watching the game. As a leader of class, organization or business your members can’t let them see you sweat especially not in public. This can lower moral and shift the positive culture. Behind closed doors sulk all you want but in front of the people, remain steady and uplifting.

Celebrate your victories:
The Dab comes after touchdowns, dunks and television appearances all of which are positive lights. As a teacher or leader celebrate your victories. If everyone in the class received high marks put on some music be creative dance it out. Look at the Ron Clark academy as an example of mixing happiness with success. Don’t be so serious and understand what your members like and join in. According to Forbes magazine when we are more positive, our brains become more engaged, creative, motivated, energetic, resilient and productive at work.

Celebrate your losses:
I’ll never forget playing youth sports. My team never lost for three years and the first smell of defeat came in a championship against a team we killed numerous times. There were more lessons in the one game of defeat than all of my three years of winning. My point is, life lessons come out of defeat. Victory can lead to being complacent and settling, which in turn may bring down a person of organization. In marketing, we call this, marketing myopia where companies totally forget about the customer needs and become short sighted. For Cam and you, defeat is short term take it in stride and come back stronger. If Cam Newton comes back and wins a Super Bowl, this will be long forgotten. The next time you throw a successful event or receive great news remember the countless losses that got you there! Keep working!

That’s all folks before I leave look at my dab with some trill students and educators after a presentation.

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Lenny Williams is one of today’s most gifted leaders in inspiring youth and countless individuals to pursue their career and educational dreams. As an 
educator and speaker, his mission is to be a voice to reach generations and a reminder that greatness can be achieved against all odds.To get more 
information or personal or business coaching please contact 
Lenny A. Williams, MBA (designbylaw@gmail.com)